Get Laid Beds – A True British Bed Maker

Get laid Beds bedframe

Get Laid Beds – A True British Bed Maker

Get Laid Beds are a UK based wooden bed maker, that specialises in the a vast array of wooden bed frames, including their iconic Low Beds, stylish Standard Height Beds and their prestigious Four Poster Beds. They have a family heritage in carpentry and using experienced craftsmanship, meaning that they take great pride in the quality and design of the wooden beds that they hand make in their workshop. They even offer an amazing 11 year guarantee on all of their wooden beds as result from their careful and experienced craftsmanship.

We live in a period in which the majority of products are mass produced and with streamlined manufacturing, which diverts away from the traditional British manufacturing values and quality. Get Laid Beds hand make all of their beds with custom alterations and special care, so each of their customers get a personalised bed with their own choice of colour finish and size. This is all done locally from their Leicester based workshop, of which they deliver worldwide to customers bedrooms.

Wooden Bed Frames

One of their most popular beds is their contemporary Platform Bed (Space Saver). The wooden Platform Space Saver bed is a popular style as a result from its space efficient design. It is designed to give you those extra few inches of space when you need them most, especially with small bedrooms and awkward spaces. In addition to boasting a contemporary design, and a minimalist aesthetic it also allows clearance underneath the bed frame which offers a valuable storage solution. With no inclusion of a headboard, the Space Saver version of the Platform Bed offers more flexibility as you can install a headboard of your own.

The main difference between Get Laid Beds wooden bed frames and others is that they are made using quality mortise and tenon joints. This method of construction makes your bed much more sturdy and durable, meaning that it can stand the test of time, which is reflected in the company’s promise of an 11 year guarantee on all their wooden beds. You can certainly be confident in the quality and British design of their wooden bed frames.

Buying Handmade British Beds

Get Laid Beds produce all their wooden bed frames locally, with bespoke sizes and finishes, as a result from being able to offer more customisable features on their handmade wooden beds. This Includes a choice between a range of colour finishes, such as sleek black, smooth white, modern chocolate and professional grey colour finishes for their Solid Scandinavian Pine bed frames.

They also offer a range of hardwood finishes, including such popular hardwoods as Oak, Walnut and Ash. This service allows you to really personalise your wooden bed frame to suit your bedroom. They also offer 17 different bed size, which range from a Small Single to such large custom sizes as a King, Super-King and their own special 7ft Super-Caesar. You can also customise the size with their alterations service which starts from as little as £55.

Additional Information

All of this ensures that your wooden bed can be handmade to be more personal to you, so you can confident that the stylish British wooden bed frame will look great in your bedroom. You can view their range of British handmade wooden bed frames, as well as their mattresses and bedding on their website here – http://www.getlaidbeds.co.uk/

This is a guest article for UK Made written by Get laid Beds.

Waitrose food labelling scam – Waitrose supermarkets stops telling customers where their products are made

Waitrose logo Dec 2015

I am deeply disappointed with Waitrose / John Lewis because they no longer label where all their own brand foods and other products come from, either on the products themselves or on their website.

I was in Waitrose in Reading the other day (27th October 2015) and as usual checked the packaging of what I was buying to make sure it was made or grown in the UK and I noticed that Waitrose no longer put country of origin on all their products.

I suppose this was to be expected as John Lewis have been failing to label country of origin on many of their products for a while, but disappointing because Waitrose / John Lewis profess their support for British farmers and British manufacturers and because as a customer I want to know where what I am buying is made. There is I understand generally no legal requirement to say where goods are from, but as a consumer the lack of information and hence lack of choice now being offered by Waitrose / John Lewis is a let down.

Examples of Waitrose own brand products with no country of origin given anymore are:

  • Waitrose Sweet and Salty Popcorn.
  • Waitrose Rich Coffee Roast (see photographs below).
  • Waitrose Essential Macaroni.

Up until recently all Waitrose products, like those in other supermarkets, always stated country of origin. I am at a loss to see why Waitrose would change that, given that they are a British firm and claim to support Great Britain and their local communities.

Presumably those products with no country of origin labelling are now being made abroad, yet Waitrose customers undoubtedly think, because Waitrose have a Royal Warrant and because they say you support British manufacturing and British farming, that they will be made in Britain. This is very misleading, and it amounts to a scam to mislead their customers.

I want to buy goods that are designed, manufactured or assembled, or grown in the UK, or preferably all of these; with raw materials sourced here too where possible and packaged in the UK using UK made packaging; and with provenance clearly labeled.

Waitrose / John Lewis can work to support British companies and British jobs and be environmentally friendly (by reducing their carbon footprint through reducing the miles goods are transported) by buying and selling British.

Of course I recognise that international trade is vital to the UK and that trade is a two way street. I don’t advocate protectionism and there is nothing wrong with buying products from abroad. I just want Waitrose / John Lewis to return to clear labelling so customers have a choice.

I want to make informed decisions about what I buy, and I’m interested in the provenance and sustainability of products. Local sourcing plays a part in that, and I’m proud to support quality British manufacturing and British farmers. Sadly, as Waitrose is my favourite supermarket, I will not be able to buy much in there now because of the lack of labelling and my money will be spent elsewhere.

Can consumers influence greedy retailers to make changes for the better? I don’t know but I would ask Waitrose / John Lewis to go back to their previous policy of clear labelling please.

I wrote to Waitrose with my concerns on 28th October 2015. They replied promptly saying they would get back to me, which they have now done. They say “that, when deciding whether or not to include country of origin we take the following in to account:

– Whether it is a legal requirement to do so, as with Beef for example. We display country of origin labelling on all meat and meat products we sell.
– Whether there is a specific policy to do so (such as with dairy, where we are currently reviewing the information we show).
– Whether the products packaging or style may indicate a geographical location, but the product is produced elsewhere – such as an Italian ‘style’ ready meal that has been produced int he UK.”

This is all very confusing and unclear.  Please join me in pushing Waitrose to go back to labelling country of origin on everything. Ask at Customer Service next time you are in store (show them a product and ask where it was made and why that is not labeled) and write to Waitrose to complain.  Please do not be buy any Waitrose own brand products that do not say where they are made on them.  Thank you for your support. Waitrose, please stop misleading your customers.

Essential Waitrose Rich Roast Coffee instant granules. Front view. Note country of origin is no longer given. Presumably this Waitrose coffee is now foreign made.

Essential Waitrose Rich Roast Coffee instant granules. Front view. Note country of origin is no longer given. Presumably this Waitrose coffee is now foreign made. This coffee used to be clearly labelled as processed and packed in the UK. Photograph by author.

Essential Waitrose Rich Roast Coffee instant granules. Front view. Note country of origin is no longer given. Presumably this Waitrose coffee is now foreign made.

Essential Waitrose Rich Roast Coffee instant granules. Label view. Note country of origin is no longer given. Presumably this Waitrose coffee is now foreign made. Photograph by author.

Waitrose Christmas 2015 Chocolate Biscuit Selection - again there is no country of origin labelling on this Waitrose product.

Waitrose Christmas 2015 Chocolate Biscuit Selection – again there is no country of origin labelling on this Waitrose product. Photograph by author.

Waitrose Christmas 2015 Chocolate Biscuit Selection. Label detail view - again there is no country of origin labelling on this Waitrose product.

Waitrose Christmas 2015 Chocolate Biscuit Selection. Label detail view – again there is no country of origin labelling on this Waitrose product. Photograph by author.

Some products (residual lines perhaps) are still labelled with country of origin, such as the Waitrose toilet roll below.

Waitrose Essential uktra soft bathroom tissue white - labelled “Produced in the UK”.

Waitrose Essential ultra soft bathroom tissue white – labelled “Produced in the UK”. Photograph by author.

BUY BRITISH – Christmas Gift Guide

Buy British Gifts this Christmas

Source: BUY BRITISH – Christmas Gift Guide

A great choice of suggested British made gifts for this Christmas – go on, make someone’s day with a present made in the UK.

Great suggestions for British made gifts for Christmas – thank you Make it British – Check out the @MakeitBritish gift guide for great gifts #MadeinBritain http://makeitbritish.co.uk/buy-british/ #BritishChristmasGifts

Traditional sewn Union flag (5x3ft) by Red Dragon Flagmakers

Traditional sewn Union flag (5x3ft) by Red Dragon Flagmakers

Is James Bond the saviour of British manufacturing?

Ever since James Bond was sent on his first big screen mission in 1962’s Dr No, the most successful franchise in movie history has been a shop window for British manufacturing. Is Spectre, the latest incarnation of Ian Flemings infamous MI5 agent, going to continue to promote brand Britannia? Bond famously has a weakness for British cars. Along side his famous Aston Martin  […]

Source: Is James Bond the saviour of British manufacturing? – A Truly British Family – Consumer champions of manufacturing & farming

spectre1208141280jpg-398894_1280w

Spectre

Another great article from A Truly British Family – Consumer champions of manufacturing & farming. Sharing to widen the audience and promote GB. Thanks British Family. Looking forward to seeing the new Bond film hopefully next week.

No more British steel in a years time? – A Truly British Family

What a terrible few weeks for British steel manufacturing. The SSI Redcar plant has closed with a loss of 2,200 jobs, Tata Steel has announced 1,200 job losses at its plants in Scunthorpe and Lanarkshire and Caparo, based in Oldbury, has now bought in the administrators.  This issue is becoming so severe that as many as 1 in 6 British steel […]

Source: No more British steel in a years time? – A Truly British Family – Consumer champions of manufacturing & farming

Britain needs a steel industry – let’s encourage the government to do something to rescue it before it’s too late.

Australian Made and British Made – How the Aussie’s seem to campaign for their country’s manufacturing and farming better than the Brits

A carrier bag advertisiing the Australian Made, Austrain Grown logo, togther with Bruce, an Australian made toy wombat. Photograph by author.

A carrier bag advertising the Australian Made, Australian Grown logo, together with Bruce, an Australian made toy wombat. Photograph by author. October 2015.

Wherever I travel in the world, I make the effort to buy locally made souvenirs and support local people. At the very least I make sure I buy a gift that is actually made in the country I am visiting.

On a recent visit to Australia in October 2015 I was impressed by a shop at Sydney airport selling purely Australian made gifts for travellers. The shop, called Purely Australian carries a wide range of Australian made products – fridge magnets, soft toys, wax jackets and bags, microfibre glasses cleaning cloths, sports clothes such as tracksuit tops, jumpers, wooly hats, Akubra hats, fridge magnets, and much more – all made in Australia. Purely Australian is Australia’s leading retailer of Australian clothing, offering a product range that reflects the fundamentals of nature, including Australian grown cotton and fine pure new wool. The Purely Group, which operates this shop, has operated retail outlets for the past fifteen years, with its primary focus on airport retailing throughout Australia. The Purely Australia Sydney Airport branch is located at Pier B after immigration control at Sydney International Airport and if you are in Sydney is a great place to shop. There are other shops at Sydney Airport selling Australian made products too, although Purely Australian seems to be the only selling just Australian made as opposed to some Australian made and mostly Chinese made souvenirs. At British airports and seaports you’ll be lucky to find anything that is not foreign made, which in some ways is strange given that in Great Britain secondary industry produces far more goods than does Australia.

The products on sale at Purely Australian stores mostly seem to carry the Australian Made logo. The Australian Made, Australian Grown logo is administered by Australian Made Campaign Limited (AMCL), a not-for-profit public company established in 1999 by the Australian Chamber of Commerce & Industry (ACCI) and the network of state and territory chambers of commerce, with the cooperation of the Federal Government. AMCL is not a government body and does not receive government funding for its core operations, which are licensing companies to use the logo and promoting Australian products both in Australia and overseas. Originally the campaign and logo were conceived by the government of Australia. The criteria for using the logo are clear – essentially the product has been manufactured in Australia (not just packaged or assembled); and 50% or more of the cost of making it can be attributed to Australian materials and/or production processes; or else grown/produced in Australia, with all of the product’s significant ingredients grown in Australia and all or nearly all of the processing has been carried out in Australia. What I like about both the campaign and the shop are the simple and clear way it is carried forward. In answer to the question “Why buy Australian Made?”, the response is simple too – “It’s good for consumers, it’s good for business and it’s good for Australia.”

My question is why can’t the Brits operate stores at our airports and seaports providing British made souvenirs, in the same way that Purely Australian stores are committed to providing an all-Australian souvenir experience and why can’t the Brits have a simple and clear buy British campaign like the Australian Made one?

http://www.sydneyairport.com.au/shop/retailer-categories/retailer-listing/retailer-detail.aspx?ret=%7B7D44A704-F7D1-42E5-AE2B-AFDE6614618A%7D&ter=%7B0D3AF84A-9190-4416-8EB0-CE3AB1C849F0%7D&cat=%7B0034A969-E784-44E9-80EA-9F445378B06A%7D

http://lsaspac.com/brand/travel-essentials/purely-australian/

https://australianmade.com.au

Purely Australian

The Purely Australian store at Sydney Airport.

Koala Australia microfibre cleaning cloth. Australian Made. Photograph by author.

Koala Australia microfibre cleaning cloth from Purely Australian in Sydney Airport. Australian Made. Photograph by author.

The 1968 I'm Backing Britain campaign

A carrier bag advertising the 1968 I’m Backing Britain campaign.

A Made in England label

A Made in England label.

There are a few Buy British campaigns currently running, such as those promoting the use of the logos below:

John Lewis's Made in UK logo. 21.09.2012

John Lewis’s ‘Made in UK’ logo as of September 2012. This logo never really came to fruition and seems to have been quietly dropped. John Lewis have though committed to increase sales of UK made products by 15% by the end of 2015/16 from a 2011/12 baseline. Whilst it is great to see a major player in retail committing to a number, JLP still fails to state country of origin on their website and on some of their products, and still sells mostly foreign made goods these days. Waitrose, like other supermarkets, sells much UK made foodstuff and pleasingly have clearly committed to continue to do so.

Red Tractor logo. The top part of the logo indicates quality assurance, whilst the flag part of the logo indicates provenance. Only Red Tracor logos carrying the Union Flag are British made; other flags indicate a food is foreign produced and / or processed.

Red Tractor logo. The top part of the logo indicates food quality assurance, whilst the flag part of the logo indicates provenance. Only Red Tractor logos carrying the Union Flag are British made; other flags indicate a food is foreign produced and / or processed.

UK food self-sufficiiecy is now just 62%, down from 75% in 1991, according to the NFU

UK food self-sufficiiecy is now just 62%, down from 75% in 1991, according to the NFU.

Grown in Britain logo. Grown in Britain promotes active management to create a more sustainable future for British woodlands.

Grown in Britain logo. Grown in Britain promotes active management to create a more sustainable future for British woodlands.

Great British Furniture (GBF) logo. IT IS Great British Furniture is an initiative to promote British made furniture run by the British Furniture Manufacturers (BFM) furniture trade association. It aims to promote UK made upholstery, cabinets, bathroom furniture, kitchen furniture, office furniture, mattresses and beds. This logo was taken from the Hypnos website.

Great British Furniture (GBF) logo. IT IS Great British Furniture is an initiative to promote British made furniture run by the British Furniture Manufacturers (BFM) furniture trade association. It aims to promote UK made upholstery, cabinets, bathroom furniture, kitchen furniture, office furniture, mattresses and beds. This logo was taken from the Hypnos website.

There are physical shops in the UK, like Things British, that only sell gifts and souvenirs that are made in the UK but non at Britain’s ports and airports that I am aware of. There are some local shops only selling British, like Buford WoodcraftJail Dornoch at Inverness Airport is one of the few gift shops at a British airport that does sell quite a few British made items but still alongside much that is foreign made. There are gift shops who sell a good range of British made gifts (alongside Chinese made tat), such as some of the museum gift shops – The London Transport Museum shop, and the National Trust shops.

On the web there are sites selling only British made such as Things British (selling only British made gifts, and supporting British designer-makers), Made in These Isles (selling British made clothes, accessories, homeware, beauty products, furniture, lifestyle products, etc; all products are “produced from within the geographical region of the British Isles”), The Great British Exchange (trade only; they source new British made products and sell them to retailers), The Great British Home (selling gifts, and homeware made in the UK), From Britain with Love (Scandinavian inspired homeware, accessories and gifts made in Britain) and DreamGB (selling British made gifts and everyday products), Pickle (“All of our products are made in the UK” they tell us – throws, picnic rugs, kitchen ware, vases, children’s shoes, toys, cards, jewellery, Christmas decorations and so on), Make The Most Of (an online networking community and seller of British goods and services direct from the providers; although the site promotes British business I do not think everything they sell is British made) and others selling gifts and more like Made Closer, Handmade GB and Not on the High Street that clearly label country of origin and sell some British made gifts.  There are gift manufacturing companies too like Custom Works (trade only; they manufacture more than 50 product lines here in their factory in Bo’ness, Scotland, with everything else they sell being imported). Victoria Eggs homeware, gifts and cards are mostly made in Britain – aprons, oven mitts, tea towels, mugs which disappointingly are foreign made but are printed in the UK, cushions, screen prints, coasters, tote bags, greetings cards and gift wrap.

There are many more companies making gift items in the UK too of course. There are websites encouraging us to buy British such as Buy British, British Family, British Made for Quality, Made in Britain, Back British Farming by the NFU, and of course my site ukmade, but non supported by the British government.

The Great British Exchange (trade only; they source new British made products and sell them to retailers) product qualifying criteria. I don’t know much about this site, but seemingly only British made goods are sold by them and they consider where raw materials and packaging come from.

The Great British Exchange (trade only; they source new British made products and sell them to retailers) product qualifying criteria. I don’t know much about this site, but seemingly only British made goods are sold by them and they consider where raw materials and packaging come from. A useful matrix for all of us.

If you travel to say Japan, Australia, New Zealand, the USA, France, or Thailand, you can easily find plenty of products that are made domestically. In this article by the British Family, James explains that they had a similar experience recently in Italy and were impressed by the number of domestically produced items easily available. As James challenges us to do in this article about Italy, look around the any British high street and see if you can find anything made in Britain!

Manufacturing in the UK allows companies to control supply, guarantee quality, offer flexibility and to be ethical and environmentally sound. I  encourage you to buy products that are made in the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) and British Overseas Territories and if buying non-British made items I would encourage you to look at goods manufactured within the Commonwealth first. When buying a jumper, a piece of furniture or a bag of apples, do you check to see where it has come from? Why not make a conscious preference to buy British made? You may have to look that bit harder as lots of goods on the High Street are foreign made these days, but Britain still makes most things. I’m backing Britain. Are you?

#BritishMade

Is Britain for sale? The true cost of Foreign ownership to us all – A Truly British Family – Consumer champions of manufacturing & farming

Is Britain for sale? The true cost of Foreign ownership to us all – A Truly British Family – Consumer champions of manufacturing & farming.

A well written article by British Family  which I want to share with you. The problem as I see it is when production is often moved abroad after a foreign takeover. For example, HP Sauce  (now owned by Heinz) is now made in the Netherlands, and American owned Cadbury have moved much of their production to Poland.

It is already the case that many British brands are foreign-owned, but the picture is complicated and sometimes foreign investment keeps British jobs in Britain. It’s a two-way street too. The UK has its share of global companies and makes a tidy return from overseas investments.

Countries like India, Japan and the USA all have processes that allow them to block foreign ownership yet we in Britain don’t have anything to protect our strategic companies of national importance from takeover and future asset stripping.

There’s a tendency amongst many firms to claim British heritage in such a way that it misleadingly implies manufacture in the UK and an assumption by consumers in the UK and abroad that for example all Cadbury chocolate is made in British (because it is still thought of as a British brand).

To be a bit more optimistic, Britain still makes most things, and we do it well.